Our Newly Professed: Sister Maria-Benedicta, O.S.B.

Sister Maria-Benedicta (previously our “Sister Molly”) made her simple vows on February 10, the Solemnity of St. Scholastica,  It was a joyful occasion that her whole family was able to join us for her profession—including so many adorable nieces and nephews! 

Sister Maria-Benedicta was born and raised in Denver, went to college at Thomas Aquinas in California, and then came back to Colorado for nursing school in Boulder.  After nursing school, while she was in Denver working at Children’s Hospital, she had many experiences that gave her a foretaste of her future life as a Benedictine nun, though she did not know it at the time.  Here she describes one such instance for us:

I was finishing up a day’s work at Children’s Hospital when the word was passed around the nurse’s station: “Rachel is going to go home on hospice this week.”  The news wasn’t surprising; Rachel, one of our dear patients in her late teens, had spent a lot of time on our floor over the last couple of years, and her medical condition had gotten much worse recently.  After I completed my shift, I walked down the hall and knocked on Rachel’s door.  I wasn’t in such a peppy mood myself that autumn.  The gentleman I had been dating had unexpectedly broken up with me a few months before, and I found myself unable to leave behind the deep sadness I was still feeling.  But that night I knew I had to say goodbye to Rachel and thank her for the gift she had been to me.  As I sat on her bed, she told me how sad she was to be dying.  I was sad with her.

As I drove home from work that night, I realized with a sudden insight that I was ALIVE, and I was filled with awe and gratitude at this awareness.  By the time I stepped inside my house, I was so overwhelmed with joy at being alive that I began to write down all the things that made me grateful for my life.  Memories and desires poured out almost faster that I could write them down.  I was so overcome with joy for the gift of my own life that the sadness that had been oppressing me for the last few months was suddenly insignificant.  I was alive!!!

My vocational call didn’t come until several years later, but the grace I received from Rachel that night was a foreshadowing of the grace I receive now in my vocation as a Benedictine nun.  The immense gratitude for the gift of my life demands a response, and my response is the complete gift of my life back to my Creator in a sacrifice of praise!  In fact, for me personally, this is not only one way, but the fullest way possible I can express my gratitude to God for creating me.

St. Benedict’s only goal is to seek God, so that we might begin now what will be brought to completion in heaven.  Using the words of St. John, he urges his monks to “run while you have the light of life that the darkness of death may not overtake you” (Rule of St. Benedict, Prologue.13).  No wonder St. Benedict directs even the most ordinary aspects of daily life so carefully.  All those short moments together make up this great gift we have called LIFE, and there is no time to waste in complacency.  I believe that the profound reverence and intentionality with which St. Benedict treats of those smallest choices reveals his deeply grateful heart.

The final verse of Psalm 150, which we sing at Lauds every Saturday and Feast day concludes, “Let everything that breathes, praise the Lord,” and I often note with gratitude that I am indeed still breathing, and I remember Rachel as we sing it.  Thank you, Rachel, for bringing me into such a full life by your death!  I pray that when I follow you into eternity someday, together in the heavenly kingdom we will praise the Lord forever.